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(showing articles 81 to 83 of 83)
(showing articles 81 to 83 of 83)

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“Hamilton,” the unprecedented smash is sold out until 2017. Tickets go for more than a month’s rent on StubHub. The digital lottery is Broadway's version of Powerball. But there might be a back door for true fanatics — but be ready to cancel all your plans for up to 24 hours.

Roughly one year ago, Sean Rameswaram made a promise to his mother: he would get her into “Hamilton” the next time she visited New York. Not having presidential-level access to the Richard Rogers Theatre, this meant hitting the cancellation line where house seats are typically offered to the public once declined by members of the cast and crew.

“Hamilton” isn't your typical show and its cancellation line is no less extraordinary. People sleep in it, people bribe their way to the front of it, and people have severe disagreements over its very existence. Undeterred, Sean and Chitra Rameswaram showed up before dawn one spring day with provisions (burritos, reading material, and lots of water) — and high hopes of not throwing away their shot. 

Chitra Rameswaram (second from right) waits in line in front of the Richard Rodgers Theatre, hoping for day-of tickets to “Hamilton”

 

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    BETHLEHEM, West Bank — President Donald Trump on Tuesday condemned a deadly attack at a pop concert in Manchester, England as the act of “evil losers” and called on nations to band together to fight terrorism.

    “The terrorists and extremists, and those who give them aid and comfort, must be driven out from our society forever,” said Trump, speaking after a meeting with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas. “This wicked ideology must be obliterated, and I mean completely obliterated and innocent life must be protected.”

    Trump spoke from Bethlehem in the West Bank, the morning after a blast that killed more than 20 people at an Ariana Grande concert. British officials have said they are treating the blast as an act of terrorism. There was no immediate claim of responsibility.

    Trump stressed his support for the United Kingdom and mourned the loss of “beautiful young people.” Relying on one of his preferred insults, Trump said he would call the perpetrators “losers, because that’s what they are.”

    The president has used the stops in Saudi Arabia, Israel and the West Bank to call for the end of such violence. In a speech in Riyadh on Sunday, he urged Muslim leaders to eradicate what he called “Islamic extremism” and cast the effort as a “battle between good and evil.”

    On Tuesday, he added: “All civilized nations must join together to protect human life and the sacred right of our citizens to live in safety and in peace.”

    Trump also expressed optimism that he can help facilitate peace between Israel and Palestinians. He said he was “truly hopeful that America can help Israel and the Palestinians forge peace and bringing new hope the region and its people.”

    Trump heads next to Europe, where planned meetings with world leaders on the economy and trade could be overtaken with discussion of terrorism and security.

    Police: 22 dead, 59 injured at Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, UK after explosion

    The post President Trump condemns ‘wicked ideology’ behind Manchester attack appeared first on PBS NewsHour.


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    A man photographs a sign in Manchester, Britain. Photo by Stefan Wermuth/Reuters

    A man photographs a sign in Manchester, Britain. Photo by Stefan Wermuth/Reuters

    WASHINGTON — The United States’ top intelligence official says the U.S. government has not yet verified that the Islamic State group is responsible for the attack in Manchester, England, but called the deadly incident a reminder of how serious the terror threat remains.

    “This threat is real, it’s not going away, and it needs significant attention,” Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats said during testimony Tuesday before the Senate Armed Services Committee. Coats said the attack was carried out by a suicide bomber.

    Authorities are expected to provides updates after 1 p.m. ET today on the Manchester explosion that killed 22 people and injured dozens more at the end of an Ariana Grande concert Monday.

    Coats appeared before the panel following a suicide attack at an Ariana Grande show in England that left 22 people dead and dozens more wounded. The Islamic State claimed it was behind the attack. The Islamic State group said one of its members planted bombs in crowds at the concert. The group warned in a statement posted on social media that more attacks are to come.

    Coats, a former Republican senator from Indiana, told the panel that the extremist group frequently claims responsibility for violent attacks. He said he had just returned from a trip to London where he met with his counterparts in the British intelligence community. Coats said their gravest concern that the potential for attacks carried out by “inspired or homegrown” extremists, which are much more difficult to detect and prevent.

    His testimony comes amid ongoing investigations into allegations that Russia tried to interfere in last year’s election. Coats refused to comment on a news report that President Donald Trump asked him to publicly deny any collusion between his campaign and Russia.

    Sen. John McCain of Arizona, the committee’s chairman, asked Coats about The Washington Post report Monday that said Trump asked Coats and Michael Rogers, the director of the National Security Agency, to push back against an FBI investigation that’s been examining potential coordination between Moscow and the presidential campaign.

    Coats did not deny the report but said he didn’t want to characterize or comment any private conversations with the president. Coats also said he had no documents about such a call. He was asked by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., if he had such material that could be provided to Robert Mueller, the special counsel named by the Justice Department to oversee the investigation.

    Associated Press writer Eric Tucker contributed to this report.

    READ MORE: 22 dead, 59 injured at Ariana Grande concert in Manchester after explosion, police say

    The post Top official says U.S. hasn’t verified ISIS claim on Manchester attack appeared first on PBS NewsHour.


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    People take part in a vigil for the victims of an attack on concert goers at Manchester Arena, in central Manchester, Britain. Photo by Peter Nicholls/Reuters

    People take part in a vigil for the victims of an attack on concert goers at Manchester Arena, in central Manchester, Britain. Photo by Peter Nicholls/Reuters

    A 22-year-old British man detonated a homemade bomb at Manchester Arena on Monday after an Ariana Grande concert, an act of terror that killed 22 people and injured dozens of others.

    The explosion, which is currently being treated as a terrorist plot, is the deadliest attack in London since July 2005 suicide bombings in London claimed more than 50 lives.

    WATCH: Police update on Manchester explosion that killed 22 people

    On Tuesday night, Prime Minister Theresa May raised the country’s terrorism threat level to “critical,” suggesting “it is a possibility we cannot ignore that there is a wider group of individuals linked to this attack.”

    Here’s what journalists and police have uncovered about the attack since Monday.

    WHAT HAPPENED?

    • Police confirmed that 22 people were killed in the explosion at the end of an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena.
    • The bombing occurred around 10:33 p.m. local time, prompting panic among the concertgoers, many young, who were exiting the venue.
    • There should be an embedded item here. Please visit the original post to view it.

    • Twelve of the 59 injured in the attack were children under the age of 16, a UK ambulance official told the Associated Press.

    WHO IS RESPONSIBLE?

    • In a brief update Tuesday, Chief Constable Ian Hopkins of the Greater Manchester Police confirmed the identity of the suspect as 22-year-old Salman Ramadan Abedi. The constable did not provide many other details, but did caution that a coroner hadn’t officially identified the bomber. Abedi reportedly died in the explosion.
    • It’s not clear whether the suspect acted alone or as part of a larger network, the constable added.
    • A law enforcement official, speaking anonymously to The New York Times, said Abedi was the son of Libyan immigrants, born in 1994 in Britain. The official also told the Times that Abedi’s ID was found at the scene.
    • Authorities said they arrested a 23-year-old in South Manchester as part of its ongoing investigation, but it’s not clear if the individual is connected to the explosion.
    • The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack, but U.S. Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats said Tuesday that the U.S. government has yet to confirm this detail.

    HOW DID LEADERS REACT?

    A man photographs a sign in Manchester, Britain. Photo by Stefan Wermuth/Reuters

    A man photographs a sign in Manchester, Britain. Photo by Stefan Wermuth/Reuters

    • President Donald Trump, speaking after a meeting with Palestine’s Mahmoud Abbas, condemned the attack Tuesday, saying that “this wicked ideology must be obliterated, and I mean completely obliterated and innocent life must be protected.”
    • On Twitter, the president said “we stand in absolute solidarity with the people of the United Kingdom.”
    • There should be an embedded item here. Please visit the original post to view it.

    • In a televised speech Tuesday, May addressed the Manchester attack, saying that, “All acts of terrorism are cowardly attacks on innocent people, but this attack stands out for its appalling, sickening cowardice, deliberately targeting innocent, defenseless children and young people who should have been enjoying one of the most memorable nights of their lives.”
    • The Queen issued a statement that called the attack an “act of barbarity.” She offered her “deepest sympathy” to those affected and thanked the emergency crews for their response.

    WHAT’S NEXT?

    • British Prime Minister Theresa May said the UK was raising its terror threat level from severe to critical, believing that another attack was imminent, AP reported.
    • This meant an increased law enforcement presence at “big events,” such as football matches and concerts, she said.
    • There should be an embedded item here. Please visit the original post to view it.

    • In a statement Monday, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security said there was no evidence to indicate a specific threat to the U.S. “However, the public may experience increased security in and around public places and events as officials take additional precautions,” it said.

    The post Everything we know about the Manchester attack appeared first on PBS NewsHour.


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